Hymns

I enjoy the old hymns because I think they have something to say.  Sometimes when we sing hymns at church, it’s easy to get “lost in the song” and just sing without really knowing what you’re singing.  I think that it is sometimes good just to read a hymn and meditate on it to get a deeper understanding and appreciation for it.  I haven’t figured out how to post directly to this page yet, so I will probably just put up a new hymn each week until I do figure it out.  I hope it will be a blessing to you.

And Can It Be That I Should Gain

Written by Charles Welsey (1738)

And can it be that I should gain
An interest in the Savior’s blood?
Died He for me, who caused His pain—
For me, who Him to death pursued?
Amazing love! How can it be,
That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me?
Amazing love! How can it be,
That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me?

’Tis mystery all: th’Immortal dies:
Who can explore His strange design?
In vain the firstborn seraph tries
To sound the depths of love divine.
’Tis mercy all! Let earth adore,
Let angel minds inquire no more.
’Tis mercy all! Let earth adore;
Let angel minds inquire no more.

He left His Father’s throne above
So free, so infinite His grace—
Emptied Himself of all but love,
And bled for Adam’s helpless race:
’Tis mercy all, immense and free,
For O my God, it found out me!
’Tis mercy all, immense and free,
For O my God, it found out me!

Long my imprisoned spirit lay,
Fast bound in sin and nature’s night;
Thine eye diffused a quickening ray—
I woke, the dungeon flamed with light;
My chains fell off, my heart was free,
I rose, went forth, and followed Thee.
My chains fell off, my heart was free,
I rose, went forth, and followed Thee.

Still the small inward voice I hear,
That whispers all my sins forgiven;
Still the atoning blood is near,
That quenched the wrath of hostile Heaven.
I feel the life His wounds impart;
I feel the Savior in my heart.
I feel the life His wounds impart;
I feel the Savior in my heart.

No condemnation now I dread;
Jesus, and all in Him, is mine;
Alive in Him, my living Head,
And clothed in righteousness divine,
Bold I approach th’eternal throne,
And claim the crown, through Christ my own.
Bold I approach th’eternal throne,
And claim the crown, through Christ my own.

I found these lyrics on hymnlyrics.org and found that this great old song has a couple of verses that I had not heard before.  The songbook at my church has only the first, third and fourth verses listed here.  I had heard the last verse sung before, but had not heard the second and fifth verses as listed here. 

“Died He for me who caused His pain- For me, who Him to death pursued”.  That is true- it was my sin that sent Jesus to the cross.  We criticize the Israelites of His day for crucifying Him, but had I been around back then, I likely would have been among the mob shouting “Crucify Him!”  It truly is an amazing love that caused my God to die for me.

“Tis mercy all, immense and free”.  It really is all mercy and nothing but mercy that showed God’s love to me.  I could keep going and going, but I will just let you read the hymn and make your own applications.

What an amazing and powerful song!

13 responses to this post.

  1. I love this hymn. My husband, daughter, and I were just singing it in the car yesterday. The words to our version are phrased a little differently. The second verse is my favorite; it is loaded with precious truth. The version we know goes like this:

    “Could my tears forever flow? Could my zeal no languor know.? These for sin could not atone. Thou must save, and Thou alone. In my hand no price I bring. Simply to thy cross I cling.”

    Reply

  2. I like your blog site. I am fairly new to wordpress so feeling my way through but thank God for His children. I enjoyed the devotional.

    Reply

  3. Hymns stir the soul like no other music can; what a blessing to be able to sing, and meditate upon, wonderful songs that glorify our Lord and Saviour! It amazes me to read about the depths the Lord allowed his servants to scrape in order to write the precious words we have in our hymn books today. Those old hymns are a part of our glorious Christian heritage we should be proud of!

    Reply

    • I totally agree. I enjoy reading some of the histories of the hymns and the people who wrote them. I too am fascinated by some of the deep and powerfully moving truths that the Lord gave to those hymn writers. Thank you for the comment!

      Reply

  4. I have a small collection of hymn books. I go to them from time to time and meditate on them. They are often filled with the most precious truths. I often include them in my entries. Four that come to mind are “A Mighty Fortress is Our God”, “O For a Thousand Tongues to Sing”, “And Can it be That I Should Gain”, and “He Washed My Eyes With Tears”.

    Reply

    • I enjoy singing a hymn on Sunday that Lord uses to speak to me and then meditating on it and humming it all week. “And Can it be that I should gain” is my dad’s favorite hymn. I may have to put that one up this week. Thank you for the comment!

      Reply

  5. Posted by Rodney on June 11, 2010 at 2:57 am

    What depth. And how apt when you consider what Christ has done for us.

    Reply

  6. I like hymns because they ten to say so much about our Lord. However I prefer more modern Christian music because the majority of them sing directly to God, which expresses my praise to Him the way hymns can’t (for me personally).

    Reply

  7. I love hearing not only new verses – which are sometimes really more wonderful than the common verses! – but also new melodies for them.

    Reply

  8. I found an old Hymnal in a used book store in Williamsburg, VA on vacation one summer. it is called – a collection of Hymns, for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Principally from the collection of the Rev. John Wesley, A.M. It is full of old hymns in their original state some with dozens of verses – many written by Charles Wesley like the one you listed above. Such wonderful stuff.

    Thank you!

    Ben

    Reply

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