Learning From Mistakes

Jotham was twenty and five years old when he began to reign, and he reigned sixteen years in Jerusalem.  His mother’s name also was Jerushah, the daughter of Zadok.  And he did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, according to all that his father Uzziah did: howbeit he entered not into the temple of the Lord.  And the people did yet corruptly.

II Chronicles 27:1-2

Jotham became king after his father, Uzziah died at the end of chapter 26.  Uzziah started out to be a good king and the Bible does say that he did that which was right in the sight of the Lord.  The Lord blessed him and he became a powerful king.  However, this prosperity led to his downfall because it filled him with pride and he went into the temple to burn incense.  That may not seem like a big deal, but it was not his job to do that, chapter 26, verse 18 tells us that the priests told him not to do it: “it appertaineth not the thee.”  Even though he wasn’t supposed to do it, he did it anyway and God immediately struck him with leprosy and he died a leper.

Fortunately, his son, Jotham, learned something from his mistake.  I like the way the Bible words things.  It tells us that he did “that which was right in the sight of the Lord, according to all that his father Uzziah did.”  Uzziah was a good king and served the Lord, until he became prideful.  Jotham copied his father’s good example.  But it also tells us that “he entered not into the temple of the Lord.”  Not only did Jotham copy his father’s good example, he also learned from his father’s mistake and the Bible specifically points out that he did not make the same one. 

Some people we can look at and follow as wonderful examples of the way a Christian should live.  Other people we can look at and learn from their mistakes.  And, often, we can look at another Christian (or ourselves, for that matter) and find both good things to copy and not so good things to avoid.  And, in those ways, we can help each other to follow the Lord.

2 responses to this post.

  1. I like this, Ben. Although it may be humbling and difficult, it’s important for me to tell others about my mistakes, so they can learn from them too. God bless you!

    Reply

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